Thursday

Where the “gold ticket to Hollywood” is getting away from a state school

 ”It’s like American Idol.. I got my gold ticket to Hollywood,”

This is a quote from a father, Nigel White, after his daughter’s name was pulled from the box in a lottery to see which children got to go to a charter school in the USA as opposed to going to a public (local government-run) school. (Source: The Sun, New York, article here.)

And here is another quote:

“In my American government class, [Ms. Cruz-Gonzales] had brought a test from a private middle school, and the stuff that they were learning in eighth grade, we were just learning now. And I, like, literally started to cry because it’s sad. Like, I understand we go to public school, but that doesn’t mean that since we can’t afford the education, we shouldn’t have it. . . . It made me feel ignorant. Really ignorant.” – Tiarra Hall, 17, 12th grade 

(Source: Washington Post article here.)

These quotations come from the research I commissioned into education in the USA. They cut through a lot of the argument. They suggest there are people who are positively desperate to get out of government-run education in the USA.

It is not just in Britain that state schools provide education which most parents recognise is below the standard that a private or even semi-independent school (such as a charter school) can provide.

Here is another quote from the article in The Sun  that shows that anyone who claims to care about the education of the poorest should worry about the poor performance of many state schools:

Despite the elation of some parents, it was hard to ignore the boxes of Kleenex placed on each table in anticipation of a few tears that may fall at the end of the evening.

“It’s hard for minorities to excel, coming from the backgrounds or neighborhoods where we come from,” a housekeeper from the Bronx, Shiboan Laboy, said. “I think education is the no. 1 way to get children out of the ghetto.”

But as it is a lottery, not everyone will get into the charter school.

Despite the elation of some parents, it was hard to ignore the boxes of Kleenex placed on each table in anticipation of a few tears that may fall at the end of the evening.

 

 

 

 

  1. The growth of school choice in the USA
  2. The LSE quota for state school students and the possible privatisation of universities
  3. Places at good state school available. Only the middle classes need apply.
  4. How the government puts an obstacle in the way of bright state school children getting into the top universities
  5. Guess where and what this school is
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